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Washington University in St Louis Olin Business School

Olin Business SchoolOlin Business School

Organizational Behavior Curriculum

PHASE ONE - FIRST YEAR

Curriculum

Research

Milestones

Fall

Spring

Core Foundations

Core Foundations

Research Design
Quant. Methods I
(6 credits)

Quant. Methods II
Data Analysis
(6 credits)

OB Courses

OB Courses

Olin courses
(3 credits)

Olin courses
(3-6 credits)

Attend OB Seminars

Begin Research Collaborations

First-year summer paper

Papers are due at the end of the first summer prior to beginning second-year course work.

PHASE TWO - SECOND YEAR

Curriculum

Research

Milestones

Communication Course

Fall

Spring

Elective Foundation Courses

Elective Foundation Courses

(3-6 credits)

(3-6 credits)

OB Courses

OB Courses

(3-6 credits)

(3-6 credits)

RA/TA Orientation (Held in August)

Attend OB Seminars

Continue research collaborations

Qualifying Exam

Second-Year Summer Paper

Papers are due at the end of the first summer prior to beginning second-year course work. Extensions may be granted pending results of the Qualifying Exam

400 RA/TA Hours

PHASE THREE - THIRD & FOURTH YEARS

Curriculum

Research

Milestones

Teaching Workshop
Communication Course

Fall

Spring

Independent Course Study & Elective OB Courses

Independent Course Study & Elective OB Courses

(6-9 credits)

(6-9 credits)

Attend OB Seminars

Paper Presentations

Dissertation Research

Conference Presentations

Proposal or Dissertation

Students must be able to assemble a committee for the proposal of their dissertation and submit a Title, Scope, and Procedure Form at the committees' approval of the proposed dissertation by the end of their fourth year.

400-500 RA/TA Hours

PHASE FOUR - FIFTH YEAR

Curriculum

Research

Milestones

Class Facilitation

Fall

Spring

Dissertation

Dissertation

(6 credits)

(6 credits)

Attend OB Seminars

Dissertation Research

Conference Presentations

Job Market

Oral Defense of Dissertation

Intent to Graduate

400 RA/TA Hours

Organizational Behavior Courses

B56 HRM 620 Seminar in Organizational Behavior I

The course surveys classic and contemporary research that addresses the design and function of organizations using methods of applied behavioral science. Examines multiple theoretical perspectives that researchers and other students of organizations have used to explain, predict, and control the behavior of individuals in organizations. Provides a familiarity with important theories and findings that comprise the field of organizational behavior. Examines how the field contributes to business education and practice.

B56 HRM 621 Seminar in Organizational Behavior II

Emotion has become one of the most popular and popularized areas within organizational scholarship. This seminar attempts to review the wide and often disjointed literature on emotion in organizations. Each session is organized around pieces of the emotion process. Students will read and present articles to the class, be active participants in discussion, and write a research proposal that integrates the role of emotion into a topic of their own research interest.

B56 HRM 624 Leadership & Social Exchange in Organizational Behavior

B56 HRM 626 Negotiations & Conflict Management

This course will critically examine current theory and empirical research on social conflict, negotiation, and bargaining. Our objective will be to prepare participants in the seminar to become effective researchers in this field of study. Classes will be student driven with a focus on discussion and critical debate. All students will be expected to contribute actively to the discussions during each class period. The final deliverable for the course will be a research project on some significant aspect of conflict and negotiation.

B56 HRM 627 Early Doctoral Pro-Seminar in Organizational Behavior

The early-stage doctoral pro-seminar is a unique course that attempts from the first semester of the PhD program in Organizational Behavior to: 1) Encourage students to start thinking critically about the work of others, 2) Encourage students to start proposing their own new ideas, and 3) Expose students to the research of the department’s faculty members in order to facilitate the development of working relationships. There will be one session of 1.75 hours scheduled with each research faculty member in the OB group (currently this number is 9), plus an introductory session with the faculty coordinator.

B56 HRM 628 Independent Study in Organizational Behavior

Internship must be arranged by the student and approved by the advising faculty member. An outline of objectives must be submitted to the PhD Office prior to enrollment. May be taken a maximum of five (5) times for credit. Credit, variable; fifteen (15) credits combined total.

B56 HRM 629 Directed Readings in Organizational Behavior

A program of readings developed by and with the approval of one or more members of the Organizational Behavior faculty. Prerequisite, approval of the Director of the PhD program. Credit, variable. May be taken up to two (2) times for credit; six (6) credits combined total.

HRM 640 Doctoral Seminar on Social Hierarchy in Organizational Behavior

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the implications of social hierarchy, or stratification in power and status within a social group, for phenomena of central interest in the field of organizational behavior. We will examine the implications of social hierarchy for topics such as conflict, negotiation, learning, creativity, interpersonal perception, emotion, diversity, and leadership. The goal of the seminar will be to review foundational theories, critically evaluate recent and emerging research, and identify areas of promise for future research on these and related topics.

Other Courses

MGT 600A Teaching Business

The course is designed to assist doctoral students in advancing their teaching capabilities. The format will include in-class discussions, group work, creating an ‘out-of-class’ video, creating a video of an ‘in-class’ session, presenting to the class, and constructively critiquing the work of others.

B53 MGT 601 Doctoral Prep: University Teaching

Two (2) credits are required for the PhD. Students must provide an Olin Professor 30 hours of assistance in the teaching function; includes, but is not limited to, conducting help sessions, grading, developing lectures or exams. Maximum of eight (8) credits allowed. Hours performed during this course do not count toward RA/TA requirements. Credits will count toward teaching requirement of the Graduate School of Arts & Science.

B53 MGT 603 Seminar in Strategy and Organization

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical work regarding the economics of organizations defined very broadly. Rather than focusing solely on organizational economics as it has evolved in the economics literature, this course emphasizes complementary and competing theoretical and empirical work in the organization theory and strategy literatures. The course also seeks to interpret and analyze observed organizational forms, trends, and choices using insights from the theories that we examine.

B53 MGT 605 Research Internship

Three (3) credits are required for the PhD. Under the direction of a faculty member, students will work (and be graded) on their own research project. This requirement will be completed when students are at candidacy and preparing a dissertation proposal. Internship must be arranged by the student and approved by the advising faculty member. An outline of objectives must be submitted to the PhD Office prior to enrollment. An additional nine (9) credits may be taken; maximum of twelve (12) credits allowed.

B53 MGT 607A Teaching Presentation Skill Workshop

This course focuses on developing presentation skills for the classroom and for conference papers. Students will deliver three presentations and write a summary performance evaluation. This course is required for all students prior to graduation in compliance of the teaching requirement governed by the Graduate School of Arts & Science.

B53 MGT 610 Dissertation

Maximum of twelve (12) credits allowed, six (6) per semester. Prerequisite: submission of Title, Scope, and Procedure Form and successful Proposal of dissertation.

Core Foundation Courses

Psych 5011 Research Designs and Methods

This course provides graduate students with a broad-based exposure to conceptual and practical issues in planning, designing, executing, and evaluating research in the behavioral sciences. Topics include Reliability and Validity, Experimental design, quasi-experimental design, and single-case research, among other topics. PREREQ: Graduate standing, Psych 5066 and 5067 or equivalent. Fall.

Psych 5066 Quantitative Methods I

Introduction to the theoretical concepts underlying quantitative methods in psychology. Topics include set theory, probability theory including the basic probability density functions and their cumulative distributions, joint events and stochastic independence, sampling theory and sampling distributions (including the binomial, normal, t, chi-square and F distributions), parameter estimation, interval estimation, the t-test, hypothesis testing, power, and some nonparametric statistics. PREREQ: Introductory Statistics. Fall.

Psych 5067 Quantitative Methods II

Continuation of Psych 5066. Introduction to multiple regression/correlation analysis. Topics include bivariate and multiple correlation and regression, representation of nominal or qualitative variables, power and orthogonal polynomials, interactions, analysis of covariance, and repeated measures design. PREREQ: Psych 5066. Spring.

Psych 5405 Seminar in Research Ethics

In-depth review and discussion of common ethical concerns encountered in research, including the use of human and animal participants, informed consent, the Belmont report, the role of the IRB, protection of special populations, deception in research, duty to refer, various forms of conflict of interest, issues of data ownership and sharing, bias and fraud in data collection, analysis, and reporting, conflicts surrounding authorship, concerns about duplicate or fragmented publication, understanding and preventing plagiarism, and the reporting of misconduct of others. Fall.

Course descriptions represent courses offered recently. Not all courses are offered every semester, and it is important to check with Olin Business School prior to scheduling classes to determine course availability for any given semester. Olin Business School reserves the right to make changes in the course offerings or descriptions.